The (Creative) Commons

I had a difficult time choosing an item to create a copyright license. At first, I wanted to copyright my Making Sense of Copyright video. I used My Simple Show to create the video, but after reading its software licensing guidelines, I decided it was too complicated to make sense of it. Therefore, I jumped ship and decided to produce a copyright license for the GIF I made during Collection I.

The licensing I chose was by-sa (Attribution-ShareAlike) simply because I don’t mind if others copy, distribute, display, perform, or modify my work, as long as they distribute any modified work on the same terms. Yes, my son is included in the GIF, but it’s hard to tell who he is — just looks like any other baby out there. I also don’t mind if people use the GIF as long as they give me credit for creating it. I didn’t choose nc (non-commercial) because I don’t mind if someone made money off this particular piece of work. If I made something that took more time and thought, I would probably change my attitude. Finally, I didn’t choose nd (NonDerivatives) because I didn’t feel like it was necessary to require users to use original copies only.

Properly Using the GIF

A baseball fanatic who is also a prolific social media user is collecting a series of GIFs that show babies throwing baseballs for the first time. The baseball fanatic googles babies and baseball and comes across my GIF at www.kevinklott.com. To properly use the GIF, he uses the contact page on my site and asks me permission. I give him permission as long as he also licenses the GIF using sa (ShareAlike).

Improperly Using the GIF

A baseball fanatic who is also a prolific social media user is collecting a series of GIFs that show babies throwing baseballs for the first time. The baseball fanatic searches babies and baseball on Google and comes across my GIF at www.kevinklott.com. The person uses QuickTime Player to screen record the GIF as an mp4 file, saves it to his desktop and posts it on Facebook as if it were his own GIF. He does this without asking permission, which is a violation of the licensing agreement that was clearly stated on my website. I see it on Facebook and ask him to remove it. The person does not remove it, so I report the violation to Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/help/325058084212425?helpref=uf_permalink

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